I don't know who I am. I don't know what I want. If you are looking for someone with a life, I can tell you I don't have one. But what I do have is a very amazing blog; a blog on which I have posted for a very long time. A blog that is a dream come true for people like you. If you leave this page without following, that'll be the end of it. I will not look for you, I will not pursue you. But if you do follow me, I will thank you, I will check out your blog, and I will love you.

 

I swear, Polaroid film was about $10 cheaper 5 years ago.

zevri:

ampullae:

can someone who hasn’t played Silent Hill please explain this image??

the man in grey is a bureaucrat who is having a meeting with a representative from the alien fleet that recently landed on earth. in alien custom, once a deal is made it must be written on a board and broken. As such, the bureaucrat brings in the blond man off the street to hold it  so no one important gets hurt. the blonde woman is cheering because she’s an alien anthropologist and likes that the bureaucrat is taking such willing part in the alien cultural norms. the alien, meanwhile, is really into this human drink called tea. thats all i got.

zevri:

ampullae:

can someone who hasn’t played Silent Hill please explain this image??

the man in grey is a bureaucrat who is having a meeting with a representative from the alien fleet that recently landed on earth. in alien custom, once a deal is made it must be written on a board and broken. As such, the bureaucrat brings in the blond man off the street to hold it  so no one important gets hurt. the blonde woman is cheering because she’s an alien anthropologist and likes that the bureaucrat is taking such willing part in the alien cultural norms. the alien, meanwhile, is really into this human drink called tea. thats all i got.

So I might be throwing a party while my mother’s out-of-state for two weeks. You’re all invited. You have to dress like 90s trash (the theme is “Only 90s Kids Throw Their Birthday Parties Six Months Late”), and the only present I really want is a stable home life.

dorkykawaiidesu:

transdimensionalbeing:

thecreationmonster:

trilluminat1:

meenahtho:

until this year of high school i always laughed at these because i thought they were inaccurate, they are not. they are not at all inaccurate.

THE MIDDLE ONE. Omg.

American public school in one post

Why do they always want to go outside?!

because we are locked inside a building for 8 hours 5 days a week for 180 days of the year

(Source: whamboombamm)

joanashino:

Yesterday at the Animal Rights march in Lisbon. I was caught in a bad moment I look grumpy sleepy, so I changed the photo to B&W because somehow it makes it look better :P
My sign reads : “With so many pedophiles in jail, why are we still testing on animals?”

joanashino:

Yesterday at the Animal Rights march in Lisbon. I was caught in a bad moment I look grumpy sleepy, so I changed the photo to B&W because somehow it makes it look better :P

My sign reads : “With so many pedophiles in jail, why are we still testing on animals?”

theabcsofjustice:

I will forever love all versions of this scene, but the dub one is the absolute best.

riyoka:

if u ask me to go to the park and just swing on swings with u there is 98% chance i will say yes and swing for 5 hours do not test me

classymorelikekhaleesi:

thegirlwiththenotebooks:

danyytargaryen:

harry and ginny having triplet boys and naming them james, sirius, and remus respectively

and mcgonagall’s reaction when they’re at hogwarts like

no

no not again

I love how this just assumes that Minerva lives for three generations of Potters

if dumbledore can live for 115 years, so can she

veganbutt:

sascoalition:

Obama will never be half the man nor love America as much as Reagan did.

Obama will never eat as many flags throughout his presidency like Reagan did. Reagan holds the current flag-eating record at 3,463 flags during his presidency. Obama is currently only at 1,072.Here we see pictured: Reagan in action during one of his flag feedings. This is speculated to be approximately his 560th flag consumed.

veganbutt:

sascoalition:

Obama will never be half the man nor love America as much as Reagan did.

Obama will never eat as many flags throughout his presidency like Reagan did. Reagan holds the current flag-eating record at 3,463 flags during his presidency. Obama is currently only at 1,072.
Here we see pictured: Reagan in action during one of his flag feedings. This is speculated to be approximately his 560th flag consumed.

(Source: )

2010 tumblr: don't be racist or homophobic or sexist. Be kind and accepting

2014 tumblr: I'm more oppressed than you. Don't listen to white rappers. Sushi is cultural appropriation. Kill straight people.

gazcreature:

thebicker:

aka14kgold:

arbitrary-mask:

thepeoplesrecord:
The 1% wants to ban sleeping in cars - it hurts their ‘quality of life’April 16, 2014
Across the United States, many local governments are responding to skyrocketing levels of inequality and the now decades-long crisis of homelessness among the very poor … by passing laws making it a crime to sleep in a parked car.
This happened most recently in Palo Alto, in California’s Silicon Valley, where new billionaires are seemingly minted every month – and where 92% of homeless people lack shelter of any kind. Dozens of cities have passed similar anti-homeless laws. The largest of them is Los Angeles, the longtime unofficial “homeless capital of America”, where lawyers are currently defending a similar vehicle-sleeping law before a skeptical federal appellate court. Laws against sleeping on sidewalks or in cars are called “quality of life” laws. But they certainly don’t protect the quality of life of the poor.
To be sure, people living in cars cannot be the best neighbors. Some people are able to acquire old and ugly – but still functioning – recreational vehicles with bathrooms; others do the best they can. These same cities have resisted efforts to provide more public toilet facilities, often on the grounds that this will make their city a “magnet” for homeless people from other cities. As a result, anti-homeless ordinances often spread to adjacent cities, leaving entire regions without public facilities of any kind.
Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere, despite the fact that the great majority of homeless people are trying to survive in the same communities in which they were last housed – and where they still maintain connections. Americans sleeping in their own cars literally have nowhere to go.
Indeed, nearly all homelessness in the US begins with a loss of income and an eviction for nonpayment of rent – a rent set entirely by market forces. The waiting lists are years long for the tiny fraction of housing with government subsidies. And rents have risen dramatically in the past two years, in part because long-time tenants must now compete with the millions of former homeowners who lost their homes in the Great Recession.
The paths from eviction to homelessness follow familiar patterns. For the completely destitute without family or friends able to help, that path leads more or less directly to the streets. For those slightly better off, unemployment and the exhaustion of meager savings – along with the good graces of family and friends – eventually leaves people with only two alternatives: a shelter cot or their old automobile.
However, in places like Los Angeles, the shelters are pretty much always full. Between 2011 and 2013, the number of unsheltered homeless people increased by 67%. In Palo Alto last year, there were 12 shelter beds for 157 homeless individuals. Homeless people in these cities do have choices: they can choose to sleep in a doorway, on a sidewalk, in a park, under a bridge or overpass, or – if they are relatively lucky – in a car. But these cities have ordinances that make all of those choices a criminal offense. The car is the best of bad options, now common enough that local bureaucrats have devised a new, if oxymoronic, term – the “vehicularly housed”.
People sleeping in cars try to find legal, nighttime parking places, where they will be less apparent and arouse the least hostility. But cities like Palo Alto and Los Angeles often forbid parking between 2am and 5am in commercial areas, where police write expensive tickets and arrest and impound the vehicles of repeat offenders. That leaves residential areas, where overnight street parking cannot, as a practical matter, be prohibited.
One finds the “vehicularly housed” in virtually every neighborhood, including my own. But the animus that drives anti-homeless laws seems to be greatest in the wealthiest cities, like Palo Alto, which has probably spawned more per-capita fortunes than any city on Earth, and in the more recently gentrified areas like Los Angeles’ Venice. These places are ruled by majorities of “liberals” who decry, with increasing fervor, the rapid rise in economic inequality. Nationally, 90% of Democrats (and 45% of Republicans) believe the government should act to reduce the rich-poor gap.
It is easy to be opposed to inequality in the abstract. So why are Los Angeles and Palo Alto spending virtually none of their budgets on efforts to provide housing for the very poor and homeless? When the most obvious evidence of inequality parks on their street, it appears, even liberals would rather just call the police. The word from the car: if you’re not going to do anything to help, please don’t make things worse.
Source

“Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere…”
HOW? WITH WHAT FUNDS? FOR WHOSE BENEFIT? TO WHERE?
Our society’s approach to its most vulnerable members: I don’t want to see them suffer—so get them out of my sight!

I live in Los Angeles. Unlike most places, our housing economy bounced back, and fast - home prices are up 20 percent just in the past year. Renting is only marginally less expensive than buying a house. I know people whose rent went up by more than $200/month in a single year.
Homeless shelters are like telephone poles: We need them, but no one wants to live near one. It’s cruel and inhumane.

Here in Nevada, we recently had a group of politicians in trouble because they’d funded a program that rounded up the homeless, put them on a bus, and drove them to California. They literally just made it someone else’s problem. They did it for years without being caught.

gazcreature:

thebicker:

aka14kgold:

arbitrary-mask:

thepeoplesrecord:

The 1% wants to ban sleeping in cars - it hurts their ‘quality of life’
April 16, 2014

Across the United States, many local governments are responding to skyrocketing levels of inequality and the now decades-long crisis of homelessness among the very poor … by passing laws making it a crime to sleep in a parked car.

This happened most recently in Palo Alto, in California’s Silicon Valley, where new billionaires are seemingly minted every month – and where 92% of homeless people lack shelter of any kind. Dozens of cities have passed similar anti-homeless laws. The largest of them is Los Angeles, the longtime unofficial “homeless capital of America”, where lawyers are currently defending a similar vehicle-sleeping law before a skeptical federal appellate court. Laws against sleeping on sidewalks or in cars are called “quality of life” laws. But they certainly don’t protect the quality of life of the poor.

To be sure, people living in cars cannot be the best neighbors. Some people are able to acquire old and ugly – but still functioning – recreational vehicles with bathrooms; others do the best they can. These same cities have resisted efforts to provide more public toilet facilities, often on the grounds that this will make their city a “magnet” for homeless people from other cities. As a result, anti-homeless ordinances often spread to adjacent cities, leaving entire regions without public facilities of any kind.

Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere, despite the fact that the great majority of homeless people are trying to survive in the same communities in which they were last housed – and where they still maintain connections. Americans sleeping in their own cars literally have nowhere to go.

Indeed, nearly all homelessness in the US begins with a loss of income and an eviction for nonpayment of rent – a rent set entirely by market forces. The waiting lists are years long for the tiny fraction of housing with government subsidies. And rents have risen dramatically in the past two years, in part because long-time tenants must now compete with the millions of former homeowners who lost their homes in the Great Recession.

The paths from eviction to homelessness follow familiar patterns. For the completely destitute without family or friends able to help, that path leads more or less directly to the streets. For those slightly better off, unemployment and the exhaustion of meager savings – along with the good graces of family and friends – eventually leaves people with only two alternatives: a shelter cot or their old automobile.

However, in places like Los Angeles, the shelters are pretty much always full. Between 2011 and 2013, the number of unsheltered homeless people increased by 67%. In Palo Alto last year, there were 12 shelter beds for 157 homeless individuals. Homeless people in these cities do have choices: they can choose to sleep in a doorway, on a sidewalk, in a park, under a bridge or overpass, or – if they are relatively lucky – in a car. But these cities have ordinances that make all of those choices a criminal offense. The car is the best of bad options, now common enough that local bureaucrats have devised a new, if oxymoronic, term – the “vehicularly housed”.

People sleeping in cars try to find legal, nighttime parking places, where they will be less apparent and arouse the least hostility. But cities like Palo Alto and Los Angeles often forbid parking between 2am and 5am in commercial areas, where police write expensive tickets and arrest and impound the vehicles of repeat offenders. That leaves residential areas, where overnight street parking cannot, as a practical matter, be prohibited.

One finds the “vehicularly housed” in virtually every neighborhood, including my own. But the animus that drives anti-homeless laws seems to be greatest in the wealthiest cities, like Palo Alto, which has probably spawned more per-capita fortunes than any city on Earth, and in the more recently gentrified areas like Los Angeles’ Venice. These places are ruled by majorities of “liberals” who decry, with increasing fervor, the rapid rise in economic inequality. Nationally, 90% of Democrats (and 45% of Republicans) believe the government should act to reduce the rich-poor gap.

It is easy to be opposed to inequality in the abstract. So why are Los Angeles and Palo Alto spending virtually none of their budgets on efforts to provide housing for the very poor and homeless? When the most obvious evidence of inequality parks on their street, it appears, even liberals would rather just call the police. The word from the car: if you’re not going to do anything to help, please don’t make things worse.

Source

Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere…”

HOW? WITH WHAT FUNDS? FOR WHOSE BENEFIT? TO WHERE?

Our society’s approach to its most vulnerable members: I don’t want to see them suffer—so get them out of my sight!

I live in Los Angeles. Unlike most places, our housing economy bounced back, and fast - home prices are up 20 percent just in the past year. Renting is only marginally less expensive than buying a house. I know people whose rent went up by more than $200/month in a single year.

Homeless shelters are like telephone poles: We need them, but no one wants to live near one. It’s cruel and inhumane.

Here in Nevada, we recently had a group of politicians in trouble because they’d funded a program that rounded up the homeless, put them on a bus, and drove them to California. They literally just made it someone else’s problem. They did it for years without being caught.